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Sunday Worship  10:30am

 

  • Nursery and Children's Church provided during Sunday Morning worship.

  

We are located at the Southeast corner of Big Beaver and Adams.

3955 W. Big Beaver Rd.
Troy, Michagan  48084
(248) 644-0512 

 

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Worship With Us

Sunday Worship
10:30am

Sunday Morning Bible Study
9:00am

We are located at
3955 W. Big Beaver Rd.
Troy, Michagan  48084

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Sermons

Sunday
Jul012018

Time of Redemption - Pentecost 6B - from Psalm 130

Children as young as three-months-old, are crying out for the comforting arms of missing parents. Most of these families who have come to our border are trying to escape violence that probably originates here in the United States. I believe that the God who redeems Israel has heard these cries of lament, and invites us to do the same. Whatever our feelings about the immigration issue, surely the cries of these children touch our hearts. If we are God’s hands and feet and voices, then we have to answer the question: how will we respond to these cries?

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Sunday
Jun242018

Living in Unity -- A Sermon for Pentecost 5B

 The 133rd Psalm is one of my favorite passages of Scripture, because it speaks to one of my passions in life. That passion is the pursuit of Christian unity. ItМs a blessing to hear the words: РHow very good and pleasant it is when kindred live together in unity!П This is especially true when the course of history seems to be pulling nation and world further and further apart.

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Sunday
Jun172018

Harvest Time -- A Sermon for Pentecost 4B

Since Mark is more interested in action than words, we rarely hear Jesus’ voice. While Mark tells us that Jesus spoke only in parables, there are only two collections of parables in Mark’s Gospel, one of which is found in Mark 4. That chapter has four parables, three of which are seed parables, while the fourth parable warns against placing your lamp under a bushel basket. This morning we’re focusing on two parables, the Parable of the Growing Seed and the Parable of the Mustard Seed. While we didn’t read the “Parable of the Sower” (Mk 4:1-9), it sets up our parables. If we’re going to understand these two parables we need to know how Jesus uses the word “seed” in these three parables. After he tells the “Parable of the Sower,” he explains it to his disciples, and he tells them that the “seed” is the “Word” of God. We’re fortunate that Mark gives us this key, because without it we might be just as confused as Jesus’ original audience. Now that we know what the sower sows, we can look at the other components of these two parables. The first question has to do with the identity of the sower. Then you have to deal with the soil and the harvester in the first parable. Then, there is the matter of the Mustard Seed, which starts small and grows large enough to provide safe shelter for the birds.

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Sunday
Jun172018

Harvest Time - Sermon for Pentecost 4B 

 

 

 

Rick mentioned another seed last Sunday at the Table. He mentioned that June is Pride Month. He reminded us that many LGBTQ folks and their families have found themselves excluded from the Table, and many have heard hateful messages coming from Christian communities. It shouldn’t surprise us that many have concluded that churches aren’t safe spaces for everyone, but I believe our decision, which wasn’t easy, to become an opening and affirming congregation has sown a seed of hope. It may take time for that seed to fully mature, but I do believe the soil is producing something special. We see this emerging plant symbolized by the rainbow flag flying by our sign. John McCauslin planted that seed, which I believe is a sign that a seed of the kingdom has been sown in our community. It signals that this is a place of welcome to everyone who has experienced exclusion. It is a seed of welcome, which is an expression of God’s realm. 

 

These are but a few of the seeds that have been sown. Other seeds might include a kind word spoken to a person who feels alone and abandoned. Recently I was walking with a friend who is running for political office. We were doing a bit of canvassing in a Troy neighborhood, and one of the people we talked to was an older man who spends his days and nights caring for his bedridden wife. He shared with us how being a care-giver can be lonely. He spoke of his concerns about the price of medicine. Maybe all we accomplished was listening to his concerns, but I believe that a seed of hope was planted in his life. There are many varieties of seeds that we have at our disposal to scatter across the land so that the Gospel might take root. We just need to let them fall on the soil, and the soil will do its part. At least that’s what Jesus says! 

 

The communion hymn for today is “Seed, Scattered, and Sown.” It reminds us that when we gather at the Table, and share in the Bread and the cup, we share in our Lord. The Lord’s Table is a sign of God’s realm. It is a reminder that seed has been scattered and sown, and now stands ready to be harvested and turned into the “Living Bread of God,” which is itself a sign of God’s realm on earth as in heaven. 

Preached by:
Dr. Robert D. Cornwall, Pastor
Central Woodward Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)
Troy, MI
June 17, 2018
Pentecost 4B
Sunday
Jun102018

Give Thanks With A Grateful Heart - Sermon for Pentecost 3B

When you read through the Psalms, you discover that they cover almost every situation under the sun. So, when we go to God, with this book of prayers and hymns as our guide, we find words that help us to speak to God. These hymns and prayers give us permission to speak honestly about our life situations. They speak of joy and love and grace, but also of anger, vengeance, and even abandonment. But, even in those cases where the Psalmist cries out “My God, My God, why have you abandoned me?” there is an accompanying word of trust and hope.

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