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Sunday Worship  10:30am

 

  • Nursery and Children's Church provided during Sunday Morning worship.

  

We are located at the Southeast corner of Big Beaver and Adams.

3955 W. Big Beaver Rd.
Troy, Michagan  48084
(248) 644-0512 

 

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Worship With Us

Sunday Worship
10:30am

Sunday Morning Bible Study
9:00am

We are located at
3955 W. Big Beaver Rd.
Troy, Michagan  48084

Map and Directions 

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Sermons

Sunday
Apr012018

The Power of the Resurrection -- Sermon for Easter Sunday 

Easter has a lot of traditions. Some are religious and others, like searching for Easter eggs, are not. What is of first importance, however, is the story of the resurrection of Jesus on the third day after he was nailed to a Roman cross. Easter is a bold declaration that death has lost its sting. God broke the bonds of death, when “up from the grave he arose, with a mighty triumph over his foes.”

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Sunday
Mar252018

Every Knee Shall Bow - A Sermon for Palm/Passion Sunday (Philippians 2)

Last Sunday we heard about Greeks approaching Philip. They asked him: “Sir, May we see Jesus?” They didn’t just want to see Jesus, they wanted to get to know him, because they believed he had something to offer that they needed. We have come this morning for the same reason. We come hoping to see Jesus and receive what we need from him.

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Sunday
Mar182018

Christ's Priestly Work -- A Sermon for Lent 5B

There were Greeks who came to Jerusalem for the Passover festival. They went up to Philip, who was from Bethsaida in Galilee, and they said to him: “Sir, we wish to see Jesus” (Jn. 12:20-21). As we continue our Lenten Journey, with Palm Sunday on the near horizon, is this not our request as well? Don’t we wish to see Jesus? The author of Hebrews introduces us to Jesus in the form of the great high priest who sympathizes with us in every respect. Hebrews tells us that Jesus has been tested as we have in all things, but is without sin (Heb. 4:14-15). Priests serve as mediators between God and God’s people, bringing sacrifices, prayers, and supplications to God on our behalf. No one takes up this responsibility unless God issues a call, as God did with Aaron and Aaron’s descendants.

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Sunday
Mar112018

Created for Good Works -- A sermon for Lent 4B

Why do we do the things we do? Is it nature or is it nurture? St. Augustine didn’t know anything about genetics, but he stood on the nature side of the equation. John Locke might not have known about genetics either, but he believed we are blank slates on which society writes. To be honest, they’re probably both correct. Whichever side we choose, we all know that bad stuff happens. This is our world, but does this world define who we are? The word we hear in the Ephesian letter tells us that once we were subjects of the “ruler of the power of the air,” but now we are seated with Jesus in the heavenly places. Because we’re seated with Jesus, we are recipients of God’s “immeasurable riches of his grace in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus.”

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Sunday
Mar042018

The Power of the Cross - A Sermon for Lent 3B

Lift high the cross, the love of Christ proclaim till all the world adore his sacred name.” We sang these words this morning as we began worship. “Lift High the Cross” is a powerful nineteenth century Anglican processional hymn. Apparently, it was inspired by Constantine’s vision that invited him to conquer his enemies under the banner of the cross. However, the version we sang is not as militaristic as some of the other hymns I grew up with. Maybe you remember singing on a regular basis: “Onward Christian soldiers, marching as to war, with the cross of Jesus going on before.” Or maybe you enjoyed singing: “Stand up, stand up for Jesus, ye soldiers of the cross; Lift high His royal banner, it must not suffer loss. From victory unto victory His army shall He lead, Till every foe is vanquished, and Christ is Lord indeed.” These last two hymns are no longer in our hymnals, because they offer us more of Constantine than Jesus, even if we may remember them fondly.

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